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The CESE solver is a compressible flow solver based upon the Conservation Element/Solution Element (CE/SE) method originally proposed by Dr. Chang in  NASA Glenn Research Center.  Some applications of this method include solving many different types of flow problems, such as detonation waves, shock/acoustic wave interaction, cavitating flows, and chemical reaction flows, fluid-structure interaction problems with the embedded (or immersed) boundary approach or moving (or fitting) mesh approach, airbag deployement and so forth.

Description: This problem shows a supersonic wedge impacting an incoming shock wave. The shock waves are then reflected on the walls and keep interacting with each other.

Description: This problem shows a sample model of shock Diamonds and Mach disk using the axi-symmetric CESE solver. This video is a courtesy of Kazuya Yamauchi of LANCEMORE Corporation, Japan.

Description: In this problem, the FSI capabilities of the CESE solver are beeing used in order to study the maximum deflection of a traffic sign under high wind conditions.

Description: This problem shows a example of compressible flow application in the domain of turbomachinery. It shows the FSI interactions between rotating solid turbine blades and the incoming high speed flow.

Description: This example is to test the interaction of fluid/shell and fluid/solid volume elements. A high-pressure (two atmospheres) air flows from left to right passing over a solid block and a shell structure, pushing both while moving to the right. The pressure initial condition is one atmosphere everywhere. A prescribed boundary condition is used on the inlet face (left), a solid wall boundary condition on the bottom right, and all other boundaries treated as open boundaries.

Description: This problem is intended to test the fluid/structure (thin shell) interaction. High-pressure (three atmospheres) air enters the bag from the bottom hole to open a folded bag. The pressure initial condition is one atmosphere everywhere. A prescribed boundary condition is used on the inlet hole, and all other boundaries are open boundaries.

Description: This problem is intended to test the fluid-structure interaction and moving mesh on piston type applications. A initially loaded spring compressed the air in the piston. Pressure waves bounce back against the wall and interact with the spring making it a complete FSI problem. The spring oscillations get progressivelly damped.

Description: In this example, a simulation of cavitating flows (cavitation area shown in red) in high-pressure, high-speed diesel injectors is done. It can provide valuable and detailed information for nozzle design and spray breakup modeling. For this problem, one slice of the axisymmetric nozzle is chosen as the calculating domain and the 2D, 2D axis-symmetric or 3D solver can be used.